GenScript 2nd Annual Gene & Cell
Engineering Virtual Summit

July 28th, 2022.
11:00AM – 6:00PM EDT

GenScript’s 2nd Annual Gene and Cell Engineering Virtual Summit will feature leaders in the life sciences from academia, pharma, and biotech, leveraging the strengths of synthetic biology technologies to develop life-changing therapies. Synthetic biology continues to revolutionize life science research, advancing gene and cell engineering and enabling the efficient development of invaluable solutions for various human diseases.

GenScript is recognized as having built a best-in-class capacity and capability for biological research services, including gene synthesis, peptide synthesis, custom antibody, and protein engineering. True to its commitment to “Make Humans and Nature Healthier through Biotechnology,” GenScript continues to partner with scientists globally through its numerous advanced platforms to facilitate research and expedite discoveries. Join GenScript in this one-day event featuring keynote presentations from invited speakers working on cutting-edge Gene and Cell engineering research.

One Day of exceptional scientific sessions entirely online with free registration.

Engage and network with leaders in the field without travel hassles.

Learn about the latest discoveries, deep insights and visions for the future from experts in the field.

Earn continuing education credit (CEC).

Speakers

*Name in Alphabetical order

Guowei Fang, Ph.D.

SVP, Global Head of Research and Early Development, Legend Biotech

Jiangbing Zhou, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University

Joseph Melenhorst, Ph.D.

Vice-Chair, Center for ImmunoTherapy & Precision Immuno-Oncology (CITI) Director, Cell Therapy & Immuno-Engineering Program, Cleveland Clinic

Alex Marson is Director of the Gladstone-UCSF Institute of Genomic Immunology and Associate Professor in the UCSF Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. He serves as the scientific director for Human Health at the Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI) and is a member of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy and a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigator. Work in Dr. Marson’s lab aims to understand the genetic programs controlling human immune cell function in health and disease, with an emphasis on developing and applying CRISPR genome engineering tools to primary immune cells, especially T cells. Combining genomics and gene editing approaches, the lab works to assess the consequences of coding and noncoding genetic variation on immune cell function and autoimmune disease risk and to genetically engineer human immune cells to target cancer, autoimmunity, and infectious diseases.

Ben Kleinstiver is a biochemist with interests in genome editing technology development and scalable protein engineering. He received his Ph.D in Biochemistry from the University of Western Ontario, and completed his postdoctoral studies at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Within the Center for Genomic Medicine at MGH, the Kleinstiver laboratory is focused on accelerating the development of CRISPR technologies. The major research goals in his laboratory are to address limitations of existing technologies, to develop new capabilities that solve outstanding needs in the genome editing field, all with the hope of transforming these technologies into genetic therapies to providing safe and effective treatments for patients.

Dr. Cafri specialized in tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy. For the last 17 years, Dr. Cafri studies the interactions between tumors and the immune system. He began his career working on chimeric molecules to enhance vaccine activity against skin cancer at the Weizmann Institute of Science. Later on, Dr. Cafri spent 4.5 years at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, specializing in treating patients with immune cells directed against cancer mutations. During his time at the NCI, Dr. Cafri was responsible for developing two clinical trials aiming to vaccinate cancer patients with their tumor mutations. Dr. Cafri also developed a method to isolate tumor-specific immune cells from patients' blood - a technique that can bypass the need for tumor resection to develop effective cancer immunotherapies. Dr. Cafri lab develops T-cell receptor therapy for patients with common epithelial cancers and innovative genetic engineering approaches to introduce genes into human T-cells.

Julien Camperi, Ph.D.

Technical Analytical Development Scientist, Cell Therapy Engineering and Development, Genentech

Possu Huang, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Stanford University

Ryan Pawell

Founder & CEO, Indee Labs

Dr. Jan Joseph (Jos) Melenhorst Professor of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine and Director of the Biomarker Program at the University of Pennsylvania. He obtained his PhD at the University of Leiden, Netherlands (Department of Hematology) on the immune etiology of Aplastic Anemia. In 1998 he moved to the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, where he did his research ‐ first as a postdoc, later as a staff scientist ‐ on the immunobiology of marrow failure syndromes, leukemic disorders, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In 2012 he was recruited by Dr. Carl June to the University of Pennsylvania, first as Deputy Director of their clinical manufacturing (cGMP) facility. After a year he was promoted to Director of Product Development & Correlative Sciences and Adjunct Associate Professor Pathology & Laboratory Medicine. In this role, he was at the cusp of the first ever CAR T cell therapy approved by FDA: Kymriah. Further, Dr. Melenhorst led to the development of correlative assay pipeline for the first triple CRISPR/Cas9 genome edited, TCR tumor-redirected T cell product in the USA, published early January of 2020 in Science magazine. In 2020 he was promoted to full Professor at the Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine where he now fully focuses his effort on the translational sciences of immunogene therapies. His laboratory’s goals are to enhance our understanding and improvement of the anti-tumor efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells through correlative, mechanistic, and functional genomics approaches

John Zuris has spent the last six years at Editas Medicine, a genome editing company focused on using CRISPR to potentially cure genetic diseases. As Associate Director of Editing Technologies, he focuses on leveraging both the CRISPR-Cas12a and the CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease modalities to achieve the best editing outcome for a chosen indication. Prior to joining Editas Medicine, John completed his postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. David Liu (Harvard University-Broad Institute) where he developed a lipid nanoparticle delivery system for CRISPR-Cas9 RNPs which allows for highly efficient genome editing in ex vivo and in vivo applications. This delivery technology was later utilized to successfully treat a rare form of deafness in an animal model. Before entering the CRISPR-space, John spent his graduate career elucidating the iron-sulfur cluster transfer and redox mechanisms for a metalloprotein involved in Type II diabetes under the supervision of Dr. Patricia Jennings (UC San Diego).

I received my BS in Chemistry from the University of Puerto Rico in 2009 where I synthesized and characterized the formation of supramolecular structures based on G-quadruplexes. I moved to the beautiful Arizonan desert to obtain my PhD in Chemistry from the University of Arizona under the guidance of Dr Indraneel Ghosh. During my PhD I was involved in the design and discovery of bivalent inhibitors of protein kinases using a cyclic peptide phage display approach. I also had the chance to engineer split-kinases and split-phosphatases to study signal transduction in cellular pathways. After receiving my PhD in 2015 I joined a small Biotech company where I developed mammalian cell based assays to profile kinase inhibitors promiscuity and membrane permeability. I joined Merck in 2018 as a Senior Scientist in the Protein Engineering group where I have had the chance to lead enzyme engineering programs to support manufacturing routes.

Xiangjun Kong, Ph.D.

Principal Scientist, Neogene

Yifan Wang, Ph.D.

Director for Target Discovery, TScan Therapeutics

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Matthew Porteus MD, PhD is the Sutardja Chuk Professor of Definitive and Curative Medicine and a Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and Maternal-Child Health Research Institute at Stanford. His primary research focus is on developing genome editing as an approach to cure disease, particularly those of the blood (such as sickle cell disease) but also of other organ systems as well. He received his undergraduate degree at Harvard in History and Science where his honors thesis studied the recombinant DNA controversy of the 1970s. He then completed his MD and PhD training at Stanford, clinical training in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital, and post-doctoral research training with Noble Laureate David Baltimore at CalTech. He works as an attending physician on the Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant service at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital where he cares for children under going bone marrow transplantation for both malignant and non-malignant diseases. His goal is to combine his research and clinical interests to develop innovative curative therapies. He served on the 2017 National Academy Study Committee of Human Genome Editing and currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Board for WADA on Cell and Gene Doping and the NIH NexTRAC advisory committee evaluating the emergence of new technologies.

Dr. Niren Murthy is a professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Murthy’s scientific career has focused on the molecular design and synthesis of new materials for drug delivery and molecular imaging. The Murthy laboratory developed the hydrocyanines in 2009, which are now one of the most commonly used probes for imaging reactive oxygen species and commercially available from multiple sources. The Murthy laboratory has developed several new nanoparticulate technologies for drug delivery, such as the polyketals, which have been used by numerous laboratories to enhance the delivery of small molecules and proteins. The Murthy laboratory has been recently focused on developing non-viral delivery vehicles that can deliver Cas9 protein, gRNA and Donor DNA in vivo. Dr. Murthy received the NSF CAREER award in 2006, and the 2009 Society for Biomaterials Young Investigator Award.

Agenda

Please click here to download agenda.

July 28, 2022 11:00AM - 11:10AM EDT
Introduction and Opening Remarks
July 28, 2022 11:00AM - 11:15AM EDT
Ray Chen
President of LSG & General Manager of RSBU, GenScript
July 28, 2022 11:20AM - 12:20PM EDT
Keynote Presentation
July 28, 2022 11:20AM - 12:20PM EDT
New Innovations in Cell Therapy
Guowei Fang, Ph.D.
SVP, Global Head of Research and Early Development, Legend Biotech
See Abstract
Human T cells are critical effectors of immune protection from infections, autoimmune pathology, and cancer immunotherapy. We use CRISPR-mediated gene editing in primary human T cells to systematically identify genetic targets that modulate the functions of T cells in contexts ranging from immunosuppression to cancer killing. By developing and applying CRISPR based methodologies such as pooled knock-in screening, CRISPR activation, and CRISPR interference, we are pinpointing the regulatory networks controlling T cell phenotypes as well as synthetic genetic programs that can be engineered into T cells to improve their utility as cell-based therapies for disease. We are working towards a range of genetically engineered cell therapies for cancer, autoimmunity, infections and other diseases.
July 28, 2022 12:25PM - 1:40PM EDT
Talk 2-3
Jos Melenhorst, Ph.D. / Xiangjun Kong, Ph.D.
July 28, 2022 12:25PM - 1:00PM EDT
CAR T cell therapy - The long-sought cure for cancer
Joseph Melenhorst, Ph.D.
Vice-Chair, Center for ImmunoTherapy & Precision Immuno-Oncology Director, Cell Therapy & Immuno-Engineering Program, Cleveland Clinic
See Abstract
  • Engineered CRISPR-Cas variants overcome natural limitations of wild-type enzymes
  • The genome is now nearly completely editable
July 28, 2022 1:05PM - 1:40PM EDT
Development of a T cell engineering platform for fully-individualized neoantigen-specific TCR therapy
Xiangjun Kong, Ph.D.
Principal Scientist, Neogene
See Abstract
Though AsCas12a fills a crucial gap in the current genome editing toolbox, it exhibits relatively poor editing efficiency, restricting its overall utility. In collaboration with Integrated DNA Technologies, we showed that this engineered variant we refer to as AsCas12a Ultra, increased editing efficiency to nearly 100% at all sites examined in HSPCs, iPSCs, T cells, and NK cells. We showed that AsCas12a Ultra maintains high on-target specificity thereby mitigating the risk for off-target editing and making it ideal for complex therapeutic genome editing applications. We achieved simultaneous targeting of three clinically relevant genes in T cells at >90% efficiency and demonstrated transgene knock-in efficiencies of up to 60%. We demonstrate site-specific knock-in of a CAR in NK cells, which afforded enhanced anti-tumor NK cell recognition, potentially enabling the next generation of allogeneic cell-based therapies in oncology. AsCas12a Ultra is an advanced CRISPR nuclease with significant advantages in basic research and in the production of gene edited cell medicines.
July 28, 2022 1:40PM - 1:55PM EDT
Break 1: Scavenger Hunt + Booth Viewing Time
July 28, 2022 1:55PM - 3:50PM EDT
Talk 4-6
Jiangbing Zhou, Ph.D. / Yifan Wang, Ph.D. / Julien Camperi, Ph.D.
July 28, 2022 1:55PM - 2:30PM EDT
Polymeric nanoparticles for non-viral gene delivery
Jiangbing Zhou, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University
See Abstract
T-cells targeting shared oncogenic mutations can induce durable tumor regression in epithelial cancer patients. Such T cells can be detected in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood of patients with the common metastatic epithelial cancers. In recent years, we and others have worked toward developing libraries of T-cell receptors targeting oncogenic mutations such as KRAS and TP53. Such T-cell receptor libraries offer an opportunity to treat patients with autologous or allogeneic T-cells genetically engineered to express selected T-cell receptors. Although attractive, such clinical application of T-cell receptor libraries should be accompanied by innovative genetic engineering platforms allowing cheaper, faster, and more flexible manufacturing solutions. This talk will discuss the methods to isolate, clone, and validate T-cell receptors targeting oncogenic mutations, the therapeutic potential of such libraries, and the genetic engineering platforms currently used for clinical manufacturing. We will also address the genetic engineering tools needed to allow such an approach to become widely and commercially applicable.
July 28, 2022 2:35PM - 3:10PM EDT
Discovery of a novel C*07:02-resticted epitope on MAGE-A1 and pre-clinical development of an enhanced TCR-T cell therapy candidate for the treatment of solid tumors
Yifan Wang, Ph.D. 
Director for Target Discovery, TScan Therapeutics
See Abstract
12333
July 28, 2022 3:15PM - 3:50PM EDT
Physicochemical and Functional Characterization of Different Engineered Cas9 variants and CRISPR-Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) Complexes.
Julien Camperi, Ph.D. 
Technical Analytical Development Scientist, Cell Therapy Engineering and Development, Genentech
See Abstract
12333
July 28, 2022 3:50PM - 4:05PM EDT
Break 2: Scavenger Hunt + Booth Viewing Time
July 28, 2022 4:05PM - 4:40PM EDT
Talk 7
Ryan Pawell
July 28, 2022 4:05PM - 4:40PM EDT
Rapid, gentle, efficient and scalable cell engineering with microfluidic vortex shedding and Hydropore
Ryan Pawell
Founder & CEO, Indee Labs
See Abstract
  • Engineered CRISPR-Cas variants overcome natural limitations of wild-type enzymes
  • The genome is now nearly completely editable
July 28, 2022 4:45PM - 5:20PM EDT
Closing Keynote Presentation
July 28, 2022 4:45PM - 5:20PM EDT
TRACeR: Antigen-centric MHC recognition by a novel engineered protein platform
Possu Huang, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Stanford University
See Abstract
12344
July 28, 2022 5:20PM EDT
Leaderboard Lockdown
July 28, 2022 5:25PM - 5:35PM EDT
Winners Announcement
July 28, 2022 5:35PM - 5:50PM EDT
Closing Remarks
July 28, 2022 5:35PM - 5:50PM EDT
 
Kay Chuang
Head of Marketing, RSBU, GenScript
Activities & Prizes

Welcome to 2nd Annual Gene & Cell Engineering Summit hosted by GenScript! Claim points by clicking on our 20th anniversary logo hidden in the corners, take a photo at Photo Booth, visit our booths and chat with someone. Enjoy and have fun!

Meta Quest 2 (Oculus)

Samsung Tablet

Portable Massage Gun

Drone

Apple Airpods

Waterproof Speaker

Wireless Car Charger

Fanny Pack

Mystery Boxes

Place Grand Prizes Place Grand Prizes
1 Oculus VR 5 Airpods
2 Tablet 6-15 Waterproof Speaker
3 Portable Massage Gun 16-25 Wireless Car Charger
4 Drone 26-35 Mystery Boxes (contains at least 3 items)

Terms and Conditions

  • Leaderboard will be locked down at 5:20pm, 7/28 EDT. Winners will receive our prizes based on the points you earned.
  • Prizes will only be shipped to participants in United States due to shipping restrictions.
Target Audience
✔ Protein Engineering Researchers

✔ Immunotherapy Researchers

✔ Gene and Cell Therapy Scientists

✔ Vaccine Development Scientists

✔ Biotechnologists

✔ Business Entrepreneurs

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